Revolt against the modern world

The Wardens Reading List Vol.1

Essential reading for men against time.

Since the inception of the Warden Post as a magazine, an aspiring medium and a true Agora for Intellectuals whose playthings are dangerous ideas of defiance, we have received a volley of questions from people are not acquainted with Rightist thought but were fascinated by the iconography of revolt we have been producing and asked us about where should they start with reading.

It is exceptionally hard to sift through all the good literature which leads to “Red pilling,” leading to a perception about the world on a higher level than the prescripted normative dominated by the Liberal Lügepresse and the dominating established left-leaning Academia.

Through an effort of shrewd selection and consideration from a wide spectrum of ideas, we have concluded that the following should be a part of every reactionary’s private Library.

1.Revolt Against the Modern World

         by Julius Evola

In what many consider to be his masterwork, Evola contrasts the characteristics of the modern world with those of traditional societies, from politics and institutions to views on life and death.

“No idea is as absurd as the idea of progress, which together with its corollary notion of the superiority of modern civilization, has created its own “positive” alibis by falsifying history, by insinuating harmful myths in people’s minds, and by proclaiming itself sovereign at the crossroads of the plebeian ideology from which it originated. In order to understand both the spirit of Tradition and its antithesis, modern civilization, it is necessary, to begin with, the fundamental doctrine of the two natures. According to this doctrine, there is a physical order of things and a metaphysical one; there is a mortal nature and an immortal one; there is the superior realm of “being” and the inferior realm of “becoming.” Generally speaking, there is a visible and tangible dimension and, prior to and beyond it, an invisible and intangible dimension that is the support, the source, and the true life of the former.” — from chapter one.

With unflinching gaze and uncompromising intensity, Julius Evola analyzes the spiritual and cultural malaise at the heart of Western civilization and all that passes for progress in the modern world. As a gadfly, Evola spares no one and nothing in his survey of what we have lost and where we are headed. At turns prophetic and provocative, Revolt against the Modern World outlines a profound metaphysics of history and demonstrates how and why we have lost contact with the transcendent dimension of being. The revolt advocated by Evola does not resemble the familiar protests of either liberals or conservatives. His criticisms are not limited to exposing the mindless nature of consumerism, the march of progress, the rise of technocracy, or the dominance of unalloyed individualism, although these and other subjects come under his scrutiny. Rather, he attempts to trace in space and time the remote causes and processes that have exercised corrosive influence on what he considers to be the higher values, ideas, beliefs, and codes of conduct–the world of Tradition–that are at the foundation of Western civilization and described in the myths and sacred literature of the Indo-Europeans. Agreeing with the Hindu philosophers that history is the movement of huge cycles and that we are now in the Kali Yuga, the age of dissolution and decadence, Evola finds revolt to be the only logical response for those who oppose the materialism and ritualized meaninglessness of life in the twentieth century. Through a sweeping study of the structures, myths, beliefs, and spiritual traditions of the major Western civilizations, the author compares the characteristics of the modern world with those of traditional societies. The domains explored include politics, law, the rise and fall of empires, the history of the Church, the doctrine of the two natures, life and death, social institutions and the caste system, the limits of racial theories, capitalism and communism, relations between the sexes, and the meaning of warriorhood. At every turn, Evola challenges the reader’s most cherished assumptions about fundamental aspects of modern life.

2.Imperium

by Francis Parker Yockey

This is Yockey’s famous masterpiece. It is inspired by Oswald Spengler’s Decline of the West. Imperium advocates the creation of a pan-European empire governed by sound principles or ‘absolute politics’. It is divided into five parts, which are concerned with History, Politics, ‘Cultural Vitalism’, America and the World Situation. Imperium deals with doctrinal matters as well giving a survey of the ‘world situation’ in the 20th century. “In this book,” writes Yockey, “are the precise, organic foundations of the Western soul, and in particular, its Imperative at the present stage.” “…What is written here is also for the true America, even though the effective America of the moment, and of the immediate future is a hostile America, an America of willing, mass-minded tools in the service of the Culture-distorting political and total enemy of the Western Civilization.” “The mission of this generation is the most difficult that has ever faced a Western generation. It must break the terror by which it is held in silence, it must look ahead, it must believe when there is apparently no hope, it must obey even if it means death, it must fight to the end rather than submit. …The men of this generation must fight for the continued existence of the West…” “The soil of Europe, rendered sacred by the streams of blood which have made it spiritually fertile for a millennium, will once again stream with blood until the barbarians and distorters have been driven out and the Western banner waves on its home soil from Gibraltar to North Cape, from the rocky promontories of Galway to the Urals.” The book’s Chicago-born author, Francis P. Yockey, was just 30 years old when he wrote Imperium in six months in a quiet village on Ireland’s eastern coast. His masterpiece continues to shape the thinking and steel the will of readers around the world.

3.The Decline of the West

by Oswald Spengler

Since its first publication in two volumes between 1918-1923, The Decline of the West has ranked as one of the most widely read and most talked about books of our time. In all its various editions, it has sold nearly 100,000 copies. A twentieth-century Cassandra, Oswald Spengler thoroughly probed the origin and “fate” of our civilization, and the result can be (and has been) read as a prophecy of the Nazi regime. His challenging views have led to harsh criticism over the years, but the knowledge and eloquence that went into his sweeping study of Western culture have kept The Decline of the West alive. As the face of Germany and Europe as a whole continues to change each day, The Decline of the West cannot be ignored.

The abridgement, prepared by the German scholar Helmut Werner, with the blessing of the Spengler estate, consists of selections from the original (translated into English by Charles Francis Atkinson) linked by explanatory passages which have been put into English by Arthur Helps. H. Stuart Hughes has written a new introduction for this edition.

In this engrossing and highly controversial philosophy of history, Spengler describes how we have entered into a centuries-long “world-historical” phase comparable to late antiquity. Guided by the philosophies of Goethe and Nietzsche, he rejects linear progression and instead presents a worldview based on the cyclical rise and decline of civilizations. He argues that a culture blossoms from the soil of a definable landscape and dies when it has exhausted all of its possibilities.

Despite Spengler’s reputation today as an extreme pessimist, The Decline of the West remains essential reading for anyone interested in the history of civilization.

3.Storm of Steel

by Ernst Jünger

A memoir of astonishing power, savagery, and ashen lyricism, ‘Storm of Steel’ illuminates not only the horrors but also the fascination of total war, seen through the eyes of an ordinary German soldier.

Young, tough, patriotic, but also disturbingly self-aware, Jünger exulted in the Great War, which he saw not just as a great national conflict but more importantly as a unique personal struggle.

Leading raiding parties, defending trenches against murderous British incursions, simply enduring as shells tore his comrades apart, Jünger kept testing himself, braced for the death that will mark his failure.

Published shortly after the war’s end, ‘Storm of Steel’ was a worldwide bestseller and can now be rediscovered through Michael Hofmann’s brilliant new translation.

4.Ride the Tiger: A Survival Manual for                             the Aristocrats of the Soul

by Julius Evola

Julius Evola’s final major work, which examines the prototype of the human being who can give absolute meaning to his or her life in a world of dissolution

  • Presents a powerful criticism of the idols, structures, theories, and illusions of our modern age
  •  Reveals how to transform destructive processes into inner liberation organizations and institutions that, in a traditional civilization and society, would have allowed an individual to realize himself completely, to defend the principal values he recognizes as his own, and to structure his life in a clear and unambiguous way, no longer exist in the contemporary world. Everything that has come to predominate in the modern world is the direct antithesis of the world of Tradition, in which a society is ruled by principles that transcend the merely human and transitory.Ride the Tiger presents an implacable criticism of the idols, structures, theories, and illusions of our dissolute age examined in the light of the inner teachings of indestructible Tradition. Evola identifies the type of human capable of “riding the tiger,” who may transform destructive processes into inner liberation. He offers hope for those who wish to reembrace Traditionalism.

 

5.Men Among the Ruins: Post-War Reflections of a Radical Traditionalist

by Julius Evola

Julius Evola’s masterful overview of the political and social manifestations of our time, the “age of decline” known to the Hindus as the Kali Yuga.

• Reveals the occult war that underlies the crises that have become a prevailing feature of modern life.

• Includes H. T. Hansen’s definitive essay on Evola’s political life and theory.

Men Among the Ruins is Evola’s frontal assault on the predominant materialism of our time and the mirage of progress. For Evola and other proponents of Traditionalism, we are now living in an age of increasing strife and chaos: the Kali Yuga of the Hindus or the Germanic Ragnarok. In such a time, social decadence is so widespread that it appears as a natural component of all political institutions. Evola argues that the crises that dominate the daily lives of our societies are part of a secret occult war to remove the support of spiritual and traditional values in order to turn the man into a passive instrument of the powerful.

Evola is often regarded as the godfather of contemporary Italian fascism and right-wing radical politics, but the attentive examination of the historical record–as provided by H. T. Hanson’s definitive introduction–reveals Evola to be a much more complex figure. Though he held extreme right-wing views, he was a fearless critic of the Fascist regime and preferred a caste system based on spirituality and intellect to the biological racism championed by the Nazis. Ultimately, he viewed the forces of history as comprised of two factions: “history’s demolition squad” enslaved by blind faith in the future and those individuals whose watchword is Tradition. This latter stand in this world of ruins at a higher level and are capable of letting go of what needs to be abandoned in order that what is truly essential not be compromised.

 

 

6.The Crisis of the Modern World

by René Guénon
The very title of the present volume calls for some initial explanation if what it means is to be clearly understood and all misrepresentation prevented. Many no longer doubt the possibility of a world crisis, taking the latter word in its most usual acceptation, and this in itself marks a very noticeable change of outlook: by sheer force of circumstance certain illusions are beginning to vanish, and we cannot but rejoice that this is so, for it is, at any rate, a favorable symptom and a sign that a readjustment of the contemporary mentality is still possible— a glimmer of light as it were— in the midst of the present chaos.
For example, the belief in a never-ending ‘progress’, which until recently was held as a sort of inviolable and indisputable dogma, is no longer so widespread; there are those who perceive, though in a vague and confused manner, that the civilization of the West may not always go on developing in the same direction, but may someday reach a point where it will stop, or even be plunged in its entirety into some cataclysm. Such persons may not see clearly where the danger lies— the fantastic or puerile fears they sometimes express being proof enough that their minds still harbor many errors— but it is already something that they realize there is a danger, even if it is felt rather than understood; and it is also something that they can conceive that this civilization, with which the moderns are so infatuated, holds no privileged position in the history of the world, and may easily encounter the same fate as has befallen many others that have already disappeared at more or less remote periods, some of them having left traces so slight as to be hardly noticeable, let alone recognizable.

7. The Shock of History: Religion, Memory, Identity

by Dominique Venner
The shock of history: we live it, neither knowing or comprehending it. France, Europe, and the world have entered into a new era of thought, attitudes, and powers. This shock of history makes clear the fact that there is no such thing as an insurmountable destiny. The time will come for Europe to awaken, to respond to the challenges of immigration, toxic ideologies, the perils of globalism, and the confusion that assails her.
But under what conditions? That is the question to which this book responds. Conceived in the form of a lively and dynamic interview with a historian who, after taking part in history himself, never ceased to study and reflect upon it.
In this text, the first of his major works to appear in English, Dominique Venner recounts the great movements of European history, the origin of its thought, and its tragedies. He proposes new paths and offers powerful examples to ward off decadence and to understand the history in which we are immersed and in which we lead our lives.Dominique Venner (1935–2013) was a French writer and historian. He wrote over fifty books about history, specialising in the history of weapons and hunting. He served as a paratrooper during the Algerian War and was jailed for 18 months for his involvement with the Organisation of the Secret Army, which sought to retain French Algeria through armed insurrection. He was subsequently involved in a decade of intense political activism and also worked with Alain de Benoist’s ‘New Right’ organisation, GRECE. Before his decision to publicly end his life in 2013, the goal of which was to awaken the minds of his European compatriots, he was in charge of the Nouvelle Revue de l’Histoire. His last book, Un Samouraï d’Occident, was published shortly after his death.

 

8.Archeofuturism

by Guillaume Faye
Archeofuturism, an important work in the tradition of the European New Right, is finally now available in English. Challenging many assumptions held by the Right, this book generated much debate when it was first published in French in 1998. Faye believes that the future of the Right requires a transcendence of the division between those who wish for a restoration of the traditions of the past, and those who are calling for new social and technological forms – creating a synthesis which will amplify the strengths and restrain the excesses of both: Archeofuturism. Faye also provides a critique of the New Right; an analysis of the continuing damage being done by Western liberalism, political inertia, unrestrained immigration and ethnic self-hatred; and the need to abandon past positions and dare to face the realities of the present in order to realise the ideology of the future. He prophesies a series of catastrophes between 2010 and 2020, brought about by the unsustainability of the present world order, which he asserts will offer an opportunity to rebuild the West and put Archeofuturism into practice on a grand scale. This book is a must-read for anyone concerned with the course that the Right must chart in order to deal with the increasing crises and challenges it will face in the coming decades. Guillaume Faye was one of the principal members of the famed French New Right organisation GRECE in the 1970s and ’80s. After departing in 1986 due to his disagreement with its strategy, he had a successful career on French television and radio before returning to the stage of political philosophy as a powerful alternative voice with the publication of Archeofuturism. Since then he has continued to challenge the status quo within the Right in his writings, earning him both the admiration and disdain of his colleagues.

 

9.Political Theology: Four Chapters on the Concept of Sovereignty

by Carl Schmitt

 

Written in the intense political and intellectual tumult of the early years of the Weimar Republic, Political Theology develops the distinctive theory of sovereignty that made Carl Schmitt one of the most significant and controversial political theorists of the twentieth century.

Focusing on the relationships among political leadership, the norms of the legal order, and the state of political emergency, Schmitt argues in Political Theology that legal order ultimately rests upon the decisions of the sovereign. According to Schmitt, only the sovereign can meet the needs of an “exceptional” time and transcend legal order so that order can then be reestablished. Convinced that the state is governed by the ever-present possibility of conflict, Schmitt theorizes that the state exists only to maintain its integrity in order to ensure order and stability. Suggesting that all concepts of modern political thought are secularized theological concepts, Schmitt concludes Political Theology with a critique of liberalism and its attempt to depoliticize political thought by avoiding fundamental political decisions.

 

 

10.The Way of Men

by Jack Donovan

The Way of Men answers the question: “What is Masculinity?”

The so-called experts give the answers that suit their masters. They tell just-so stories to protect their ideology, their religion, their way of life. They look to women for a nod of approval before speaking. They give socially acceptable answers and half-truths.
If what they have to say resonates with men, it is only because they manage to hint at the real answer.
The real answer is that The Way of Men is The Way of The Gang.
Manliness — being good at being a man — isn’t about impressing women. That’s a side effect of manliness.
Manliness isn’t about being a good man. There are plenty of bad guys – real jerks –who are manlier than you are, and you know it.
Manliness is about demonstrating to other men that you have what it takes to survive tough times.
Manliness is about our primal nature. It’s about what men have always needed from each other if they wanted to win struggles against nature, and against other men.
The Way of Men describes the four tactical virtues of the survival gang.
The Way of Men explains what men want, and why they are rapidly disengaging from our child-proofed modern world.
The Way of Men examines the alternatives and sketches a path out of our “bonobo masturbation society” through a new Dark Age.

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 Comment
  1. The-Egyptian says

    where is Vol.2 ?

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