Blood and Thunder

The sweat of a man’s brow and the work of his hands, even at the basic level of agriculture, is violence: it is a violation upon Mother Earth, who is all too willing to give up a bounty to those willing to dominate her.

Brotherhood, and the Judeo-Christian Type

…the very aim of Traditionalism is to render intelligible the now-decadent Hyperborean roots of all Indo-European beliefs. As such, it makes little sense to criticize each other in this way, because we are quibbling over which fractured tradition is better than any other.

A Short Note On Effeminacy

The effeminacy I criticize is a flaw of the natural woman in much the same way that wanton cruelty is the flaw of natural man: the primeval sin, the biological Adversary which every sapient creature does battle with when he fights to impose his will on his twisted and imperfect body. In this way, effeminacy is constitutive, but not definitive, of Woman.

The Measure of a Man

I am not a man. Man is too feminine an identity to describe my lived experience. If there is a spectrum between “man” and “woman”, then a spectrum which extends beyond both is possible, as well. I identify as an Alpha Male.

On Mental Health, Part 2

Though it is morally right to prescribe something analagous to medical intervention in cases of “mental disorders” the key terms are “analagous to”, “disorder”, and perhaps even “intervention” rather than “medical” and “illness”.

On Mental Health, Part 1

With [descriptors of a normal range of functions] out the window, diagnostic medicine becomes a matter of opinion rather than a pursuit of truth and health.

Writing and Rewriting

She is a Socialist only insofar as she is anti-capitalist, a Marxist only insofar as she despises meritocracy, and a Freudian only insofar as she feels constrained by her sexuality. The irony of this negative identity is that it could very well describe a Fascist just as easily as a Marxist-Leninist Socialist, but Linnet clings to specific writers and ideas for what meagre positive identity she possesses.

Trouble in Paradise: Disagreements After Death

Mill’s concept of the value of pleasure is much closer to Epicurus’ than it is to Nagel’s, and he continues to say “the accusation supposes human beings to be capable of no pleasures except those of which swine are capable. If this supposition were true … the rule of life which is good enough for the one would be good enough for the other.”